College of Education

  • Mary Baldwin Commencement 2015Faculty

    Pam Bailey, Tiffany Barber, Irving Driscoll, Emily Ely, James Harrington, Gayle Hefty, James McCrory, Rachel Potter, Stephanie Sebolt, Alice Waddell, Tamra Willis

    Our Mission

    The mission of the College of Education is to prepare confident practitioners who apply solid academic knowledge, strong leadership skills, and compassion for others to serve learners in diverse communities. We support this mission by providing personalized paths to meet individual goals while modeling and encouraging inquiry and reflection, integrating theory and practice, and providing opportunities for exploration and innovation within a collaborative environment.

    Accreditation

    The Mary Baldwin University of Education is accredited by the Virginia Department of Education and by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (now the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation or CAEP) for a period of seven years from April 2015 to April 2022. This accreditation certifies that Mary Baldwin University’s professional education program has provided evidence that it adheres to accreditation standards.

  • Undergraduate and Post-Baccalaureate Teacher Licensure Policies and Offerings

    There are multiple paths to teacher licensure for students at Mary Baldwin University, and they are outlined below.

    Undergraduate students preparing to teach must complete all requirements for the BA or BS, complete a major in one of the disciplines or an interdisciplinary major, and meet professional studies requirements and additional requirements particular to the area of licensure.

    Students pursuing Elementary Education Licensure are encouraged to pursue the Liberal Arts and Educational Studies major. The American Studies major with an emphasis in American Studies for Educators (see American Studies, American Studies for Educators) would be a second recommendation. Students seeking licensure to teach at the middle or secondary level must major in the area in which they intend to teach (see details below), and should minor in Education.

    Undergraduate students may also minor in Education without pursuing licensure. There are additional options for individuals who already hold a baccalaureate degree and for undergraduates who wish to obtain their undergraduate degree, master’s, and licensure in as little as five years.

    Requirements for licensure are approved by the Virginia Department of Education. Due to the multiple requirements, this program should not be attempted by students who plan to graduate from college in less than four years. All students enrolled in the program must devote their final semester entirely to student teaching.

    Students seeking both licensure and a graduate degree do so through the Master of Arts in Teaching program. For more information, please, see the Graduate Offerings section below.

    Non-Licensure Programs and Certificates

    The College of Education provides non-licensure as well as non-degree opportunities for students. Through the BA/MEd program, students have the opportunity to combine undergraduate and graduate work, in order to complete a Bachelor of Arts (BA) and a Master of Education (MEd). This option is available to residential and adult degree students.

    There are options for obtaining a certificate at the graduate level or adding an area of endorsement to an already existing license. Information about these options can be found in the Graduate Offerings section below.

  • This major provides prospective elementary and special education teachers the breadth of subject mastery that is expected both for effective teaching of diverse students in a collaborative setting and for meeting requirements set by the Virginia Department of Education. This major provides the best opportunity to prepare highly-qualified classroom teachers within the four years of the undergraduate degree program.

    This major includes content and professional studies requirements for licensure. Therefore, students seeking licensure will also be required to meet Education program admission requirements and successfully complete student teaching in order to qualify for a Virginia Teaching License.

    Requirements for the Major in Liberal Arts and Educational Studies

    61.5–73.5 semester hours. Credits will vary depending on endorsement area being sought and program in which student has been accepted. There will be minor differences in the requirements for BA/MAT students. For more information, please see the Liberal Arts and Educational Studies Major section of the myMary Baldwin College of Education tab.

    For Elementary Education

    *Education (26 s.h.)

    ED 110 Practicum in Education
    ED 115 Foundations of Education
    ED 120 Understanding Exceptional Individuals
    ED 300 Elementary School Methods and Practicum
    ED 323 Language Acquisition and Reading I
    ED 324 Language Acquisition and Reading II and Practicum
    ED 325 Classroom and Behavior Management
    ED 400 Senior Seminar and Project

    *English: Two of the following (6 s.h.)

    ENG 204 Children’s/Young Adult Literature
    ENG 220 American Literature: Colonial to Romantic
    ENG 221 American Literature: Realism to Present

    *Math (9 s.h.)

    MATH/ED 156 Numeration and Algebra for Teachers
    MATH/ED 158 Geometry and Measurement for Teachers

    Plus one of the following:

    MATH 155 Mathematics in Contemporary Society
    MATH 159 College Algebra
    MATH 171 Pre-calculus with Trigonometry

    *Social Studies (12 s.h.)

    HIST 111 Survey of U.S. History to 1877
    HIST 112 Survey of U.S. History from 1877
    HIST 101 Western Civilization to 1648 OR HIST 102 Western Civilization from 1648
    ANTH 227 People, Place and Culture

    *Science: Two of the following from different disciplines with one course containing a lab (7 s.h.)

    BIOL 100 The Living World
    BIOL 111 Principles of Biology
    BIOL 112 Diversity of Life
    BIOL 141 Field Biology
    CHEM 121 General Chemistry I
    CHEM 151 Chemistry in the Kitchen
    INT 165 Earth Science
    PHYS 100 Exploring the Physical World

    *Economics: One of the following (3 s.h.)

    ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics
    ECON 112 Economic Geography
    ECON 150 Experimental Economics

    *Psychology (3 s.h.)

    PSYC 210 Child Psychology OR ED 212 Lifespan Human Development

    NOTE: ECON 112 will satisfy the Economic and Geography requirement. If taking ECON 112, it is not necessary to also take ANTH 227 or other ECON course.

    For Special Education

    *Education (29-30 s.h.)

    ED 111 Practicum in Special Education
    ED 115 Foundations of Education
    ED 205 Characteristics of Exceptionality
    ED 215 Foundations and Legal Issues of Special Education
    ED 218 Transitioning in the Special Education Environment
    ED 305 Classroom Management and Collaboration in Special Education Setting
    ED 315 Differentiated Strategies in Instruction and Assessment for Speical Ed w/ Practicum
    ED 323 Language Acquisition and Reading I
    ED 324 Language Acquisition and Reading II and Practicum OR ED 350 Content Area Reading
    ED 400 Senior Seminar and Project

    *English: Two of the following (6 s.h.)

    ENG 204 Children’s/Young Adult Literature
    ENG 220 American Literature: Colonial to Romantic
    ENG 221 American Literature: Realism to Present

    *Math (9 s.h.)

    MATH/ED 156 Numeration and Algebra for Teachers
    MATH/ED 158 Geometry and Measurement for Teachers

    Plus one of the following:

    MATH 155 Mathematics in Contemporary Society
    MATH 159 College Algebra
    MATH 171 Pre-calculus with Trigonometry

    *Social Studies (12 s.h.)

    HIST 111 Survey of U.S. History to 1877
    HIST 112 Survey of U.S. History from 1877
    HIST 101 Western Civilization to 1648 OR HIST 102 Western Civilization from 1648
    ANTH 227 People, Place and Culture

    *Science: Two of the following from different disciplines with one course containing a lab (7 s.h.)

    BIOL 100 The Living World
    BIOL 111 Principles of Biology
    BIOL 112 Diversity of Life
    BIOL 141 Field Biology
    CHEM 121 General Chemistry I
    CHEM 151 Chemistry in the Kitchen
    INT 165 Earth Science
    PHYS 100 Exploring the Physical World

    *Economics: One of the following (3 s.h.)

    ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics
    ECON 112 Economic Geography
    ECON 150 Experimental Economics

    *Psychology (3-6 s.h.)

    PSYC 210 Child Psychology AND PSYC 211 Adolescent Psychology

    OR ED 212 Lifespan Human Development

    NOTE: ECON 112 will satisfy the Economic and Geography requirement. If taking ECON 112, it is not necessary to also take ANTH 227 or other ECON course.

  • Minor in Education

    A minor in Education does not meet the requirements for a Virginia teaching license. Students interested in pursuing licensure should arrange to meet with an education advisor to go over specific licensure requirements.

    Requirements for the Minor in Education

    19-23 semester hours
    ED 110
    ED 115
    ED 120

    And the requirements for one teaching level:
    * Elementary Education: PSYC 210 OR ED 212, ED 300, ED 323, ED 324
    * Middle Education: PSYC 211 OR ED 212, ED 310, ED 350
    * Secondary Education: PSYC 211 OR ED 212, ED 310, ED 350

    Requirements for the Minor in Education with a Concentration in Art Education

    Paul Ryan, coordinator

    ART 125
    PSYC 210 AND PSYC 211
    OR ED 212
    ED 110
    ED 115
    ED 120
    ED 300
    ED 310
    A major in studio art including: emphasis in one of painting, drawing, printmaking, ceramics, graphic design

    Requirements for the Minor in Education with a Concentration in Music Education

    Lise Keiter, coordinator

    ED 110
    ED 115
    ED 120
    PSYC 210 AND PSYC 211
    OR ED 212
    MUS 310
    MUS 311
    A major in music, either performance emphasis or music history and literature emphasis, including: MUS 217, a minimum of one year of piano, a minimum of one year of voice, and a minimum of six semesters of choir

    Requirements for the Minor in Special Education

    Tiffany Barber, coordinator

    22–25 semester hours
    ED 111
    ED 115
    ED 205
    ED 215
    ED 305
    ED 315
    PSYC 210 AND PSYC 211
    OR ED 212

    Initial Licensure Endorsement Areas

    • Elementary Education (PK–6)
    • Foreign Language — French or Spanish (PK–12)
    • Middle Education (in a teaching subject area for grades 6–8)
    • Music Education — Vocal/Choral (PK–12)
    • Secondary Education (in a teaching subject area for grades 6–12)
    • Special Education — General Curriculum (K–12)
    • Theatre Arts (PK–12)
    • Visual Arts (PK–12)

     

    Add-on Endorsements

    Add-on endorsements are not stand-alone endorsements. A student must seek another endorsement simultaneously or already hold an active teaching license. Add-on endorsements offered are:

    • English as a Second Language (ESL)*
    • Mathematics – Algebra I

     

    *Must complete the equivalent of a spoken modern foreign language through the intermediate level prior to applying for the ESL endorsement.

    As soon as the student identifies an interest in pursuing teacher licensure, he or she should arrange a meeting with an education advisor to go over specific licensure requirements.

  • Undergraduate Admission Requirements for the Education Program

    Students in the Residential College for Women and Baldwin Online and Adult Programs undergraduate students must apply for acceptance into the Education program by the end of the sophomore year or upon completion of 53 credit hours. Application forms are available on the myMary Baldwin College of Education tab.

    To be accepted into the Education program students must:

    • Have a minimum overall GPA of 2.5
    • Have a GPA of 3.0 on professional studies courses
    • Submit a completed application form
    • Submit passing test scores as shown by one of the following options:

     

    1. Praxis Core scores (Reading, Writing, Math)
    2. SAT or ACT scores
    3. Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and Praxis Core Math scores (or remedy option for students who fail to achieve a passing score on the Praxis Core Math assessment)

    *Acceptable minimum passing scores can be found at the following link: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/teaching/educator_preparation/college_programs/entry_assessment.pdf

    • Submit two recommendation forms completed by people who have observed the professional or academic work ethic of the student
    • Submit a one-page, typed writing sample (topic provided on the application form)
    • Possess suitable personality traits such as character, dependability, emotional stability, interpersonal skills, and temperament, as evidenced by faculty and practicum teachers

     

    Periodic reappraisal of teacher candidates will be made as the student progresses through the program.

    Students who have a bachelor’s degree and wish to seek initial licensure may apply for admission into the Post Baccalaureate Teacher Licensure Program. These students follow the same admission procedure as undergraduates and are evaluated on the same criteria.

    In the event that a student has been convicted of a felony, and/or had a teaching license revoked by another state, if all other admission requirements have been met and after the Education Committee has favorably reviewed the application, the student will petition the state, through the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, for an exemption to the felony and license revocation clauses of the Virginia Department of Education regulations. The Education Committee may conditionally admit the person to the Education program, allowing her/him to take classes; however, the individual will be prohibited from student teaching until the exemption has been approved by the state.

    Examinations, Incompletes, Grade Reports, Grade Changes

    To receive credit for a course, a student must take the examination or its equivalent as prescribed for the course by the instructor.

    • The temporary symbol of I may be given at the end of a course if, for reasons beyond his or her control, a COE student is unable to complete the course work.
    • An Incomplete may be given only with the approval of the dean of the College of Education and of the course instructor.
    • Incomplete work must be completed by the end of the next semester. In unusual circumstances, such as prolonged illness, with the approval of the instructor or the dean of the College of Education, time may be extended.
    • If the work is not completed within the time specified, the College of Education office will assign the grade awarded by the instructor based on the work completed to date.
    • Note that the Baldwin Online and Adult Programs policy regarding ET (extended time) does not apply to COE coursework.

     

    Requests for grade changes will not be considered if initiated by students later than the first week of classes in the semester following distribution of the official grade which is being contested. A student with questions about a grade should first contact the course instructor to determine if there is an error. If so, the instructor must report the correct grade to the dean of the College of Education immediately. If there is no error, and the student desires to contest the grade, the student must submit written reason(s) for the appeal to the dean of the College of Education. The dean forms a hearing committee consisting of the dean, the director of academic and student services, the student’s advisor, and two faculty members. The committee reviews the written appeal, hears statements from both the student and the instructor involved, and approves or disallows a change.

    Requirements for Teacher Licensure

    • Professional studies and teaching area requirements approved by the Virginia Department of Education
    • Demonstrated successful student teaching experience
    • Overall 2.5 GPA
    • 3.0 GPA on professional studies course work
    • Professional studies courses offered through Mary Baldwin may not be taken for P/NC credit
    • Passing score on Praxis II assessment for applicable endorsement area
    • Passing score on Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA)
    • Passing score on the Reading for Virginia Educators (RVE) Assessment for Elementary and Special Education licensure only
    • Successful completion of Child Abuse Recognition training
    • Successful completion of certification or training in emergency first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and the use of automated external defibrillators (AED).
    • Successful completion of Virginia State and Local Civic Education module (for Elementary, Middle History & Social Science, and Secondary History & Social Science endorsements only)
    • Successful completion of a Virginia Board of Education-approved industry credential examination (for Secondary Business endorsement only)

     

    Computer Technology Competency

    Technology competencies are embedded in the courses leading to teacher licensure through a variety of demonstrations, applications, and projects.

    Student Teaching

    Students who are admitted to the Education program are eligible to apply for student teaching during their final semester.

    Requirements for Approval to Student Teach (for undergraduate and PBTL students):

    • Full admission to the Education or PBTL program and continue to meet requirements
    • Submit an application to student teach prior to the published deadline
    • Satisfactory completion of at least 90 hours of practicum experience in local public schools
    • Documentation of successful field experiences
    • Suitability for teaching as demonstrated in course work and field experiences
    • Overall GPA of 2.5 or higher
    • Minimum GPA of 3.0 in professional studies courses
    • A grade of B- or better in ED 300, ED 310, or ED 315
    • A grade of B- or better in the following courses: any ED course, PSYC 210, PSYC 211, MATH/ED 156, and MATH/ED 158
    • Demonstrated personal and professional qualities, including responsibility, effective communication, enthusiasm, resourcefulness, flexibility, and professional behavior

     

    Note: Approval for student teaching does not necessarily guarantee licensure approval. Candidates for licensure must earn a grade of B or better in student teaching, an overall 2.5 GPA, and a 3.0 GPA on professional studies courses. Additionally, candidates must successfully complete all relevant assessments for licensure as outlined in the Requirements for Teacher Licensure section above and as required by the Virginia Department of Education.

  • The BA/MAT is designed as a program which allows students to complete a Bachelor of Arts (BA), a Master of Arts in teaching (MAT), and teacher licensure upon graduation. This program is available to both RCW and Baldwin Online and Adult Programs students. Students combine graduate courses with undergraduate work, leading to an MAT prior to the start of their teaching careers and enriching their pre-service preparation. Students interested in the BA/MAT should arrange a meeting with an education advisor to thoroughly review all course requirements.

    Course Restrictions

    Prior to admission to BA/MAT, students may only take two graduate courses (six semester hours). Following admission to BA/MAT, students may take additional graduate courses, but will be assessed an additional nominal fee to do so, beyond the first six semester hours. No more than 18 graduate semester hours may be taken prior to BA conferral for students in the BA/MAT program.

    Terms of Graduate Study

    Students must be in the program full time at least two semesters as an MAT student following conferral of the BA degree.

    Admission Requirements for the BA/MAT

    Students in the Residential College for Women and Baldwin Online and Adult Programs undergraduate students must apply for acceptance into the BA/MAT program by the end of the sophomore year or upon completion of 53 credit hours. Application forms are available on the myMary Baldwin College of Education tab.

    To be accepted into the BA/MAT program students must:

    • Have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0
    • Submit a completed application form
    • Submit passing test scores as shown by one of the following options:

     

    1. Praxis Core scores (Reading, Writing, Math)
    2. SAT or ACT scores
    3. Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and Praxis Core Math scores (or remedy option for students who fail to achieve a passing score on the Praxis Core Math assessment)

    *Acceptable minimum passing scores can be found at the following link: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/teaching/educator_preparation/college_programs/entry_assessment.pdf

    • Submit two recommendation forms completed by people who have observed the professional or academic work ethic of the student
    • Submit a one-page, typed writing sample (topic provided on the application form)
    • Possess suitable personality traits such as character, dependability, emotional stability, interpersonal skills, and temperament, as evidenced by faculty and practicum teachers
  • Post Baccalaureate Teacher Licensure (PBTL)

    Through the Post Baccalaureate Teacher Licensure Program, students who already have a bachelor’s degree can pursue initial licensure. This is a licensure program, which takes into account all of the credits a student has already earned and applies those toward the goal of obtaining a Virginia teaching license. For more information on PBTL, please contact the College of Education.

    Admission Requirements for PBTL

    To be accepted into the PBTL program, students must:

    • Complete an online application for admission
    • Submit official transcripts from all institutions where college coursework was completed
    • Have a minimum overall GPA of 2.5
    • Submit passing test scores as shown by one of the following options:

     

    1. Praxis Core scores (Reading, Writing, Math)
    2. SAT or ACT scores
    3. Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and Praxis Core Math scores (or remedy option for students who fail to achieve a passing score on the Praxis Core Math assessment)

    *Acceptable minimum passing scores can be found at the following link: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/teaching/educator_preparation/college_programs/entry_assessment.pdf

    • Submit a written statement discussing your reasons for entering the teaching profession

     

    Requirement for Continuous Enrollment, Leave of Absence

    Students are expected to remain enrolled continuously from the date of their initial registration for courses until completion of the degree. However, because of family emergencies or special situations, students may need to stop registering for new course work for a semester or two. The decision to do so should be made by the student in consultation with the advisor. Students who do not enroll in education courses for three consecutive sessions (or one calendar year) are considered “inactive” and no longer receive mailings from the College of Education. Inactive students who wish to re-enter the program must reapply and must pay a re-enrollment fee of $50, if accepted. Records of inactive students who wish to re-enter the program are reviewed for reactivation. Certain conditions may be set for re-entry into the program: e.g., if program requirements have changed during the time students were on inactive status, they may have to meet the new requirements.

    Academic Progress

    Beginning in Spring 2015, PBTL students will follow the same academic standing requirements as RCW and Baldwin Online and Adult Programs students. Please see the Academic Probation and Academic Suspension and Dismissal sections of the catalog for more detail.

  • The Bachelor of Arts/Master of Education (BA/MEd) allows residential and adult degree students to complete both a Bachelor of Arts and a Master of Education. Students combine graduate courses with undergraduate work, leading to a MEd one year following completion of the BA degree.

    Concentration areas for this option are:

    • Adult and Higher Education
    • Applied Behavioral Analysis
    • Autism Spectrum Disorders
    • Environment-Based Learning

     

    Course Restrictions

    Prior to admission to BA/MEd, students may only take two graduate courses (six semester hours). Following admission to BA/MEd, students may take additional graduate courses, but will be assessed an additional nominal fee to do so, beyond the first six semester hours. No more than 18 graduate semester hours may be taken prior to BA conferral for students in the BA/MEd program.

    Terms of Graduate Study

    Students must be in the program full time at least two semesters as an MEd student following conferral of the BA degree.

    Transfer Credit

    Up to two graduate equivalent courses taken at other institutions may be considered for transfer credit, if taken within 3 years of admission, and if a grade of B or better is earned (Exception: all ABA-specific courses must be taken at Mary Baldwin in order to meet Behavior Analysis Certification Board requirements).

    Admission Requirements for the BA/MEd

    • Junior or senior class status as either an RCW or Baldwin Online and Adult Programs student
    • 3.0 or higher overall GPA
    • Two letters of reference from Mary Baldwin faculty members
    • Written goal-statement essay as part of the application

     

    Program Requirements for the BA/MEd

    At least 18 semester hours to be completed over the course of two or more semesters, following BA conferral.

    Required Courses (for all concentration areas):

    IN 627 Contemporary Learning Theory for Diverse Learners
    IN 629 Leadership in Education
    IN 630 Methods of Professional Inquiry
    ED 631 Technologies to Advance Learning
    ED 632 Inquiry Research Project (Thesis) IN 630 is a pre-requisite for this class; ED 632 must be taken post-BA.

    Adult and Higher Education Emphasis

    IN 628 Public Policy and Community Relations in Education
    ED 651 Perspectives on U.S. Higher Education
    ED 652 Adult Development
    ED 653 The History of Adult Education
    ED 654 Special Topics
    ED 655 Internship

    Applied Behavior Analysis Emphasis

    PSYC 513 Basic Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis
    ED 592 Behavior Analysis: Measurement and Assessment
    ED 593 Ethics and Special Considerations
    ED 594 Fundamental Elements of Behavior Change
    Graduate Education Elective
    Graduate Education Elective

    Autism Spectrum Disorders Emphasis

    ED 640 Characteristics and Assessment of Students with ASD
    ED 641 Communication, Language and Sensory Aspects of ASD
    ED 642 Social Skills Instruction and Behavior Strategies for Students with ASD
    ED 643 Practicum Experience: ASD
    Graduate Education Elective
    Graduate Education Elective

    Environment Based Learning

    IN 626 Environment-Based Learning
    IN 634 The Intersection of Life and Land: Issue-Driven Investigations
    ED 618 Natural Research: Plant and Animal Studies in the Outdoors
    ED 620 The Outdoor Classroom
    EBL Elective Course (summer)
    EBL Elective Course (summer)

  • Graduate Policies and Offerings

    Mary Baldwin University offers two unique graduate programs for teachers and prospective teachers:

    The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) balances liberal arts courses with professional studies, and includes requirements for initial teacher licensure in:

    • Elementary PK–6
    • Middle School 6–8 (Language Arts, Math, Science, and Social Studies)
    • Secondary Education 6–12 (English, Math, and History & Social Science)
    • Special Education — General Curriculum K–12

     

    Through coursework, students may concurrently complete an add-on endorsement in the following areas:

    • English as a Second Language (ESL)*
    • Gifted Education
    • Mathematics – Algebra I

     

    *Must complete the equivalent of a spoken modern foreign language through the intermediate level prior to applying for the ESL endorsement.

    The Master of Education (MEd) program flexibly addresses the needs of teachers who are already licensed, and other educators whose careers don’t require a teaching license.

    The MEd offers emphasis options in:

    • Adult and Higher Education
    • Applied Behavior Analysis
    • Autism Spectrum Disorders
    • Environment-Based Learning
    • Leadership
    • Special Education
    • Elementary Education
    • Gifted Education

     

    Additionally, Mary Baldwin University offers a Comprehensive Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorders and a Certificate in Environment-Based Learning.

    Graduate education programs are nonresidential and are available on Mary Baldwin’s Staunton campus and at our regional locations in Charlottesville, Richmond, and Roanoke. Courses for both MAT and MEd programs are offered throughout the calendar year, including a full complement of courses during the summer. Note that the MEd focus on Environment-Based Education has a summer component offered on the historic Staunton Campus.

    Admission

    All students who matriculate at Mary Baldwin University agree to abide by the rules, regulations, and standards set by the college. The college will offer the MAT or MEd to those who meet the established standards. Students who seek the MAT or MEd must be admitted to the graduate program. They are eligible for financial aid services. The Declarations section of this catalog states Mary Baldwin’s policies on nondiscrimination, student privacy rights, and other important provisions.

    Special Students

    Persons who possess bachelor’s degrees from accredited institutions are eligible to enroll in graduate education courses as special students. No financial aid services are provided to special students. Teachers seeking re-certification credits may enroll as special students. Students enrolled as undergraduates or post-baccalaureate teacher licensure (PBTL) students at Mary Baldwin University may be permitted to take up to two graduate education courses as special students. They must receive permission from the Dean of the College of Education with support from their academic advisor.

    Admission Requirements for the MAT

    • A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution.
    • Adequate general education course work. For students seeking an initial teaching license, a transcript review will determine adequate background in the arts, humanities, natural and social sciences, mathematics, and English.
    • An academic major in the arts and sciences or an appropriate discipline (or interdisciplinary major).
    • For some endorsement areas: College algebra and English composition or the equivalent. Adequate coursework in World and U.S. history, and science in two different discipline areas.
    • Minimum 3.0 (B) average in last 60 semester hours.
    • Correct, fluent written and spoken English. Non-native English speakers must submit a TOEFL score of 600 or above on the paper-based test or 75 on the computer-based test with a minimum score of 18 in each section. Alternately an overall score on the IELTS of 7.0 or above may be accepted in lieu of the TOEFL.
    • Submit passing test scores as shown by one of the following options:

     

    1. Praxis Core scores (Reading, Writing, Math)
    2. SAT or ACT scores
    3. Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment (VCLA) and Praxis Core Math scores (or remedy option for students who fail to achieve a passing score on the Praxis Core Math assessment)

    *Acceptable minimum passing scores can be found at the following link: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/teaching/educator_preparation/college_programs/entry_assessment.pdf

    Students who do not provide qualifying program entry assessments may be admitted as conditional students to the MAT program and work with their advisors for opportunities to address any deficit areas in basic communication skills.

    Admission Requirements for the MEd

    • A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution.
    • Adequate general education course work. For students seeking an add-on endorsement to their licenses, transcript review will determine adequate background for the program.
    • An academic major in the arts and sciences or an appropriate discipline (or interdisciplinary major).
    • Minimum 3.0 (B) average in last 60 semester hours.
    • Correct, fluent written and spoken English. Non-native English speakers must submit a TOEFL score of 600 or above on the paper-based test or 75 on the computer-based test with a minimum score of 18 in each section. Alternately an overall score on the IELTS of 7.0 or above may be accepted in lieu of the TOEFL.

     

    Admission Requirements for the Comprehensive Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    • A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution. (This requirement can be waived on a case-by-case basis for individuals without undergraduate degrees who are professionally serving individuals with autism and who demonstrate the capability to handle graduate-level work.)
    • Minimum 3.0 (B) average in last 60 semester hours.

     

    Admission Process

    Applicants to the graduate education program must submit the following to the College of Education at Mary Baldwin University:

    • Online application for admission/enrollment
    • Official transcripts of all post-secondary work (for degree-seeking students)
    • MAT applicants must provide qualifying program entry assessments
    • Two letters of reference from professional educators (including higher education faculty and administrators) and/or employers, school faculty and administrators who have observed/supervised the applicant in instructional, administrative, tutoring, training or guidance roles (for degree-seeking students)
    • A goal-statement essay (for degree-seeking students)

     

    Note: An interview is suggested and may be required.

    Admission Decisions

    Admissions decisions are made by the policies established through the Education Policy Committee. The College of Education informs applicants, in writing, of their admission status and the date of the next orientation. Applicants are advised at the time of their admission regarding any additional undergraduate course requirements that must be fulfilled as conditions of enrollment. Any individual may be denied admission to the graduate Education program for the following reasons:

    • Attempting to obtain admission by fraudulent means or through misrepresentation of material facts
    • Falsification of records or documents
    • Conviction of any felony
    • Conviction of any misdemeanor involving moral turpitude, sexual offense, drug distribution, or physical injury
    • Failure to meet stated program admission requirements.

     

    Full Admission

    Students who meet all admissions requirements are admitted to the graduate education program as fully admitted degree-seeking students.

    Conditional Admission

    Students whose GPAs are below 3.0 may be considered for conditional admission on the basis of strong evidence that they can succeed in a graduate teacher preparation program that requires maintenance of a 3.0 GPA. Students who do not provide qualifying program entry assessments, may be admitted as conditional students to the MAT program and work with their advisors for opportunities to address any deficit areas in the basic communication skills.

    Conditionally admitted students are permitted to enroll in up to three graduate education courses to establish program-based evidence of their ability to perform in a graduate program. Conditionally admitted students must achieve a minimum 3.0 GPA in all graduate work and complete all other admissions requirements in order to be considered for full admission. In general, conditional admission status does not continue for more than three successive semesters.

    Moving from Conditional to Full Admission Status

    The College of Education monitors the progress of conditionally admitted students at the end of each semester. Course grades, course instructors’ assessment of students’ writing and speaking skills, and professional qualities evaluations are considered in this review. The College of Education informs students and their academic advisors in writing regarding their status:

    • continued conditional admission
    • admission to full degree-seeking status, or
    • dismissal.

     

    Transfer Credit

    The graduate Education program may accept up to six hours of transfer credit from another accredited graduate program. Such transfers will be considered only if all of the following conditions are met:

    • The Dean of the College of Education determines on the basis of catalog and course materials submitted by the student that the course content is identifiable with the aims and philosophies of the graduate curriculum.
    • The credit was earned in a regionally accredited graduate program.
    • The credit was earned no earlier than three calendar years before the student’s admission to the program, and a grade of B or better was earned.

     

    The student is responsible for determining in advance of enrollment whether courses taken in the graduate program can be transferred to another graduate program or will satisfy credential requirements outside Virginia. After the drop deadline, a determination that courses are not transferable is not grounds for refund of tuition or fees.

    Course Substitution Policy

    Students who are in a program pursuing licensure who have taken a licensure-required course at another institution at the undergraduate level in the last five years with a grade of B or better may request taking another graduate elective in lieu of taking a graduate version of an undergraduate course they have already taken. This may be done for no more than two courses. Note that course substitutions are not accepted for ED 607 unless the undergraduate equivalent was taken at Mary Baldwin.

    Orientation

    Students are required to participate in an orientation prior to enrollment. New students receive notice of orientation in their admission letters.

    Advising

    Each graduate student is assigned an advisor who is a member of the education faculty. The advisor assists the student in making course selections, meeting competency requirements, enrolling and participating in Professional Development Institutes, and preparing for the final project. The advisor reviews academic progress and performance related to professional qualities standards. He or she may make recommendations concerning a student’s status to the graduate faculty, committees, and administration upon request or as necessary.

    Tuition and Fees 2015–2016

    Tuition for all courses in the graduate Education program is determined on an annual basis.

    In addition, the following fees apply:
    Orientation $50
    Re-Enrollment $50 (See Requirement for Continuous Enrollment below)
    Technology and Library fee $58/semester
    Graduation $100

    Financial Aid

     Mary Baldwin makes every effort to assist students who need to obtain funding for education. Students should contact the Office of Financial Aid and Student Campus Employment at the time of application. To qualify for aid, students must be accepted in the graduate Education program (not special students), meet registration deadlines each semester, and make satisfactory academic progress in the work attempted. Aid is awarded pending approvals of federal and state agencies.

    Aid for Which Graduate Students May Qualify

    (Subject to approval and funding by federal and state agencies)

    Type of Aid Enrollment Status Repayment Required   How to Apply and Comments
    Unsubsidized Stafford Loan full-time, half-time  monetary repayment Apply through college. Borrow from lender. Not need based.

     

    Academic Policies

    Academic policies applicable to graduate students are published in this catalog. Other statements of program policies are maintained in the College of Education. Policies may be amended at any time by the faculty, who determine the date at which amended policies become effective. The completion requirements for each student are those in effect on the date of first enrollment as a fully-accepted, continuously enrolled, degree-seeking student. Occasionally, some exceptions may apply if changes are made to teacher licensure regulations at the state level. Students are required to report name, address, e-mail, and telephone number changes to the registrar and to the graduate program. Students may petition for exemption from academic policies. The request must include the recommendation of the student’s advisor. Petitions are granted only for cause, and only with the approval of the Education Policy Committee. A petition for exemption from or modification of a completion requirement may be granted only by the graduate faculty.

    Honor System

    The provisions of the college’s Honor System apply to graduate students. Students are responsible for understanding the provisions of the Honor System and seeking information from professors as to the application of the Honor Code to course activities.

    Code of Conduct

    The provisions of the college’s Code of Conduct apply to graduate students.

    Moral and Ethical Responsibility

    Graduate students may not engage in behavior or actions that endanger themselves or others, either while on Mary Baldwin’s property or while engaged in a program or activity connected with the college and/or its programs. Students are required to comply with professional standards of schools in which they engage in practicum or research, interning, student teaching, or other activities connected with the college and/or its programs.

    Copyright Policy

    The college enforces all provisions of copyright law. Students are responsible to inform themselves of the law, particularly with respect to copying.

    Research on Human Subjects

    Federal, state, and college policies regarding research on human subjects apply to all research involving Mary Baldwin students, faculty, or staff as researchers or as subjects, including research undertaken in the graduate Education program.

    Requirement for Continuous Enrollment, Leave of Absence

    Students are expected to remain enrolled continuously from the date of their initial registration for courses until completion of the degree. However, because of family emergencies or special situations, students may need to stop registering for new course work for a semester or two. The decision to do so should be made by the student in consultation with the advisor. Students who do not enroll in graduate education courses for three consecutive sessions (or one calendar year) are considered “inactive” and no longer receive mailings from the College of Education. Inactive students who wish to re-enter the program must reapply and must pay a re-enrollment fee of $50, if accepted. Records of inactive students who wish to re-enter the program are reviewed for reactivation. Certain conditions may be set for re-entry into the program: e.g., if program requirements have changed during the time students were on inactive status, they may have to meet the new requirements.

    Add-Drop Procedures

    A graduate student may drop a course without penalty prior to the second meeting of the class. For online and blended courses, the course must be dropped by the end of the first week of the semester. A course may be dropped for medical or providential reasons at any time, upon approval of the Dean of the College of Education. The Dean in consultation with the teaching team determines the student’s final course grade when the course is dropped after the official drop period. These policies also apply to practica, field experiences, and student teaching enrollments. A student may add a course prior to the second meeting of the course, or prior to the second week of the semester for online and blended courses. Please see the Tuition and Financial Aid section of this catalog for the proration policy concerning tuition refunds.

    Auditing Courses

    The instructor approves audits on a space available basis. Students who audit courses are expected to meet all reading and oral discussion requirements for the course. Full tuition applies to audited courses.

    Sequence of Courses

    Each graduate education student’s advisor recommends a sequence of courses which takes into account the student’s preparation and educational needs.

    Course Enrollment Priorities

    Graduate education students are enrolled in courses according to the following priorities: candidates for the MAT or MEd first, followed by fully admitted degree-seeking MAT or MEd students, conditional students, and special students.

    Contact Hours

    The syllabus of each graduate course includes a schedule of class contact hours required for the course. The syllabus includes goals, requirements, assignments, and attendance and grading policies, as well as criteria for evaluating students’ writing and speaking skills.

    Grades

    The grading symbols used by the college’s graduate Education program are as follows:
    A excellent
    A-, B+ very good
    B good
    B- competent
    C minimum passing
    F failing

    Specific course grading scales are noted in the syllabus for each class and are determined by the instructor.

    Grade point equivalents are:
    A = 4.0
    A- = 3.7
    B+ = 3.3
    B = 3.0
    B- = 2.7
    C = 2.0
    F = 0

    A minimum 3.0 GPA is required to earn a graduate degree at Mary Baldwin University. The grade point average is determined by dividing the total grade points earned by the total semester hours credit attempted in the graduate Education program. Transfer courses are not included in the GPA.

    Examinations, Incompletes, Grade Reports, Grade Changes

    To receive credit for a course, a student must take the examination or its equivalent as prescribed for the course by the instructor.

    • The temporary symbol of I may be given at the end of a course if, for reasons beyond his or her control, a COE student is unable to complete the course work.
    • An Incomplete may be given only with the approval of the dean of the College of Education and of the course instructor.
    • Incomplete work must be completed by the end of the next semester. In unusual circumstances, such as prolonged illness, with the approval of the instructor or the dean of the College of Education, time may be extended.
    • If the work is not completed within the time specified, the College of Education office will assign the grade awarded by the instructor based on the work completed to date.
    • Note that the Baldwin Online and Adult Programs policy regarding ET (extended time) does not apply to COE coursework.

     

    Requests for grade changes will not be considered if initiated by students later than the first week of classes in the semester following distribution of the official grade which is being contested. A student with questions about a grade should first contact the course instructor to determine if there is an error. If so, the instructor must report the correct grade to the dean of the College of Education immediately. If there is no error, and the student desires to contest the grade, the student must submit written reason(s) for the appeal to the dean of the College of Education. The dean forms a hearing committee consisting of the dean, the director of academic and student services, the student’s advisor, and two faculty members. The committee reviews the written appeal, hears statements from both the student and the instructor involved, and approves or disallows a change.

    Academic Progress

    Degree-seeking graduate education students are required to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in graduate work to remain in good standing and to graduate from the program. No more than one “C” may be counted on the student’s records. To maintain degree-seeking status in the program, students must repeat any other courses in which they receive a grade of “C” or lower. The original grade is not removed from the permanent record, but the lower grade is removed from the GPA calculation. Repeated work must be done at Mary Baldwin. In order to be recommended by Mary Baldwin University’s MAT or MEd program to the Commonwealth of Virginia for an initial teaching license or for an additional endorsement on an existing license, a student must earn a letter grade of “B” or better in ED 609, ED 610 or ED 614 (Student Teaching) or ED 608 or ED 615 (Field Experience). A student whose GPA falls below 3.0 at the end of any semester is placed on warning. At the end of the second semester during which a student’s GPA is below 3.0, the student’s record is reviewed by the College of Education, which may place the student on probation for a stated period, attach conditions to the probation, or dismiss the student. To be removed from probation or to complete the degree, a student must fulfill any conditions attached to the probation.

    In the event that a student earns a grade of D or F in any course in the program, the course in which the unsatisfactory grade was earned must be repeated with a successful grade earned prior to enrolling in any further courses in the program. If the particular course is unavailable during the next semester, with advisor recommendation and Dean approval, the student may be permitted to proceed with other coursework until such course becomes available, at which time, the course with the D or F grade must be repeated before proceeding with any other courses.

    A student who has been dismissed for academic reasons may, after one calendar year, reapply for admission to the degree program. The College of Education will review the student’s application for readmission as well as the applicant’s previous performance and the reasons for dismissal; additional information may be requested from the applicant and his/her references, and from other relevant professional and educational sources. The College of Education communicates the readmission decision to the applicant.

    Admission to Candidacy

    To determine whether students are making satisfactory progress toward the degree, the College of Education evaluates the progress of each student who has completed 18 semester hours. Also included in this review are the professional qualities evaluations.

    Prior to each student’s admission to candidacy status, instructors of all courses except Student Teaching and Seminar rate as satisfactory or unsatisfactory the student’s performance in the professional qualities components of the course, separately. The criteria for the ratings are provided in each course syllabus. Students who meet the following standards are admitted to candidacy automatically:

    • Total GPA of 3.3
    • No course grade lower than 3.0
    • No unsatisfactory ratings of oral or written English
    • No pattern of “concern” ratings on professional qualities evaluations.

     

    Professional Qualities Evaluation

    Graduate faculty advisors and the Dean of the College of Education review all students’ professional qualities evaluations and course grades at the end of each semester. If in their judgment a pattern of concern about professional qualities from either the course or practicum evaluations is evident, both the students and their academic advisors are notified in writing. Advisors and/or the Dean may request a review by the Education Policy Committee. The request for review may be accompanied by a recommendation to the committee that the student be placed on warning or probation. The Education Policy Committee reviews the student’s file and determines what his/her continuing status should be and what conditions are placed on the student, or whether the student should be dismissed.

  • Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT)

    Overview

    The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) is designed to offer realistic, practical preparation for enriched classroom teaching through a balanced program of liberal arts and professional studies. All courses are team-taught by graduate faculty members and classroom teachers who serve as “teaching partners.” Courses throughout the 39–45 semester hour program focus on inquiry — the processes by which students and teachers ask questions, study, and learn about human experience. Program coursework includes requirements for initial teacher licensure in the areas of Elementary Education (PK-6), Middle Education (6-8), Secondary Education (6-12), and Special Education – General Curriculum (K-12). Those who already hold a valid teaching license can earn add-on endorsements in Gifted Education (K-12), Elementary Education (PK-6), English as a Second Language (ESL), and Special Education (K–12). To be recommended for teacher licensure, students must complete all relevant program requirements and receive the MAT degree. Students may opt to complete Virginia Department of Education licensure requirements in advance of receiving the MAT degree, with an option called Licensure First. In the Licensure First option, students complete licensure requirements for their area of endorsement, and apply for an initial teaching license, while continuing to complete the remaining master’s degree requirements. The MAT program offers close contact with faculty members and advisors and extensive observation and hands-on experience in the classroom.

    Practicum Requirement

    The practicum experience is designed for MAT students who are preparing to teach as a career. Students have the opportunity to observe and assist teachers in the classroom, and to discuss their experiences with the instructor and other students. Students are required to complete 140 clock hours of practicum experience. Through this experience, students become familiar with the dynamic culture of schools and classrooms and their curricula, teaching strategies, and organizational and management features. Students learn more from the practicum experience if they actively assist in the classroom. The student should confer with the cooperating teacher regarding graduate course assignments to be completed in the practicum and plan how the MAT course assignments can best be accomplished. In practicum, students work under the supervision of an experienced teacher and begin to apply the knowledge and skills gained in MAT courses in the context of today’s classrooms. The practicum requirement also includes completion of a practicum journal, documenting the student’s actual time in the classroom (clock hour form) as well as activities and reflections upon the classroom experiences. Students should refer to the “Graduate Practicum Handbook” available on the myMary Baldwin College of Education tab for additional information on this requirement.

    Requirements for the Master of Arts in Teaching

    Required minimum credit hours: 39

    Required courses:
    ED 601 Inquiry into Human Growth, Development, and Diversity
    ED 602 Meaning and Purpose: The Foundations of Education
    ED 603 Thoughtful Assessment of Students
    ED 605 An Integrated Approach to Language Arts (not required for secondary education)
    ED 606 An Inquiry Approach to Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Area
    ED 607 Instructional Strategies for Inquiry-based Classrooms (except those pursuing special education licensure)
    ED 625 Classroom and Behavior Management

    Select 3 of the following 5 courses (secondary education students select 2, one of which must be in the discipline area sought):
    IN 601 Inquiry in Mathematics (required for elementary licensure)
    IN 603 Inquiry in Social Sciences
    IN 605 Inquiry in Natural Sciences
    IN 607 Inquiry in Humanities
    IN 609 Inquiry in the Arts

    Additional required courses for students pursuing special education licensure:
    IN 620 Inquiry into the Legal and Political Processes of Exceptionality
    ED 622 An Integrated Approach to Exceptionality
    ED 624 An Inquiry Approach to Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction
    ED 627 Collaborations and Transitions for Exceptional Students

    Additional required courses for students pursuing secondary education licensure:
    ED 622 An Integrated Approach to Exceptionality
    ED 624 An Inquiry Approach to Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction

    Student teaching sequence:
    ED 609/610/614 Student Teaching/Internship (6 s.h.)
    ED 611 Seminar (2 s.h.)
    ED 613 Reflective Synthesis Project (1 s.h.)

    Additional requirements:

    • Any additional content courses or co-requisite requirements for specific endorsement areas
    • Participation in four Professional Development Institutes
    • Minimum GPA of 3.0 in program
    • To be processed for licensure, students must earn a B or better in Student Teaching
    • Satisfactory oral and written language skills
    • Satisfactory performance on professional qualities standards
    • Participation in required student and program evaluations
    • Passing scores on applicable standardized tests required by the Commonwealth of Virginia, which, depending on licensure sought, may include: Praxis II, VCLA, and the RVE
    • Successful completion of certification or training in emergency first aid, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and the use of automated external defibrillators (AED)
    • Successful completion of Virginia State and Local Civic Education module (for Elementary, Middle History & Social Science, and Secondary History & Social Science endorsements only)
    • Demonstration of technology competency by completion of the Computer Competency checklist
    • Documentation of instruction in state requirements regarding the recognition and reporting of child abuse and neglect
    • Successful completion of a Virginia Board of Education-approved industry credential examination (for Secondary Business endorsement only)
  • Master of Education (MEd)

    Overview

    The Master of Education (MEd) is a professional degree designed for those who seek advanced study in education and related fields. The program is intended for teachers who are already licensed or individuals who are pursuing careers that do not require teacher licensure.

    The degree consists of 33 graduate semester hours, focused on a common set of 15 credit hours, and followed by an area of emphasis of the student’s choice. The areas of emphasis are:

    • Adult and Higher Education
    • Applied Behavior Analysis
    • Autism Spectrum Disorders
    • Leadership
    • Environment Based Learning
    • Special Education (with add-on licensure option)
    • Gifted Education (with add-on licensure option)
    • Elementary Education (with add-on licensure option)

     

    Requirements for the Master of Education

    Required minimum credit hours: 33

    33 semester hours (All courses 3 s.h. unless noted.)
    IN 627 Contemporary Learning Theory for Diverse Learners
    IN 629 Leadership in Education
    IN 630 Methods of Professional Inquiry
    ED 631 Technologies to Advance Learning
    ED 632 Inquiry Research Project
    ED 732 (1 s.h.) Inquiry Research Project Extension (only if ED 632 is not completed in one semester; may be repeated for credit)
    And completion of at least one of the following areas of emphasis:

    Adult and Higher Education Emphasis
    IN 628 Public Policy and Community Relations in Education
    ED 651 Structure, Power, and Freedom: Perspectives on U.S. Higher Education
    ED 652 Adult Development: Emerging Adulthood and Beyond
    ED 653 The History of Adult Education
    ED 654 Special Topics in Adult and Higher Education
    ED 655 Internship in Adult and Higher Education

    Applied Behavior Analysis
    PSYC 513 Basic Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis
    ED 592 Behavior Analysis: Measurement and Assessment
    ED 593 Ethics and Special Considerations in Behavior Analysis
    ED 594 Fundamental Elements of Behavior Change and Change procedures
    Two additional graduate courses approved by the advisor

    Autism Spectrum Disorders
    ED 640 Characteristics and Assessment of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    ED 641 Communication, Language, and Sensory Aspects of Autism Spectrum Disorder
    ED 642 Social Skills Instruction and Behavioral Strategies for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    ED 643 Practicum Experience: Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Two additional graduate courses approved by the advisor

    Leadership Emphasis
    IN 628 Public Policy and Community Relations in Education
    IN 631 Curriculum Development and Design
    IN 632 Education Law
    IN 633 Assessment and Planning for Instructional Improvement
    Two additional graduate courses approved by the advisor.
    (Some courses may require the director’s approval.)

    Environment-Based Learning Emphasis
    IN 626 Environment-Based Learning
    IN 634 The Intersection of Life and Land: Issue-driven Investigations
    ED 618 Natural Research: Plant and Animal Studies in the Outdoors
    ED 620 The Outdoor Classroom: EBL Program Development, Implementation, and Evaluation
    Two additional Environment-Based Learning courses
    One additional 3 s.h. graduate course approved by the advisor.

    Special Education Emphasis
    IN 620 Inquiry in the Legal and Political Processes of Exceptionality
    ED 622 An Integrated Approach to Exceptionality
    ED 624 An Integrated Approach to Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction
    ED 625 Classroom and Behavioral Management: Theory and Practice
    ED 608 Field Experience in Special Education
    One additional 3 s.h. graduate course approved by the advisor.

    Gifted Education Emphasis
    ED 603 Thoughtful Assessment
    ED 615 Gifted Education Field Experience (1 s.h.)
    ED 622 An Integrated Approach to Exceptionality
    ED 623 Advanced Studies of Gifted Learners
    ED 624 An Inquiry Approach to Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction
    Two additional 3 s.h. graduate courses approved by the advisor.

    Elementary Education Emphasis
    ED 605 An Integrated Approach to Language Arts
    ED 606 An Inquiry Approach to Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Area
    ED 607 Instructional Strategies for Inquiry-based Classrooms
    ED 608 Field Experience in Elementary Education
    ED 625 Classroom and Behavior Management
    One additional 3 s.h. graduate course approved by the advisor.

    Note: Additional co-requisites apply and are determined following a detailed transcript analysis.

  • Comprehensive Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Overview

    One of the greatest challenges schools and caregivers face today is the sharp rise in children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Mary Baldwin University is helping to provide educators — and others seeking employment in any human services field — with comprehensive training and experiences in the field of ASD. Approved by the Virginia Autism Council, Mary Baldwin University’s Comprehensive Certificate in the Area of Autism Spectrum Disorders will help those professionals work with and provide support to individuals with ASD in schools and in the greater community.

    Each course in the four-course sequence (12 semester hours) meets online 4–6 times throughout the semester and is supplemented with additional online requirements. Students may complete the certificate program as a special student or as a degree-seeking student (in combination with an MAT or MEd).

    Requirements for the Comprehensive Certificate in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ED 640 Characteristics and Assessment of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    ED 641 Communication, Language, and Sensory Aspects of Autism Spectrum Disorder
    ED 642 Social Skills Instruction and Behavior Strategies for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    ED 643 Practicum Experience: Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Behavior Analysis Certification Board® Approved Course Sequence in Applied Behavior Analysis

    Overview

    The BACB® has approved a four-course sequence at Mary Baldwin University toward eligibility for taking the Board Certification Exam to be a Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA). This sequence is well-suited to those in teaching, social work, mental health, criminal justice and behavioral services field. Additional requirements for eligibility to take the BCaBA exam include an undergraduate or graduate degree in an approved field and supervised fieldwork. Mary Baldwin will work with students to assist in setting up field placement experiences, though there may be an additional required cost for private supervision of those hours. Please see the Behavior Analyst Certification Board® website for more details about degree and fieldwork requirements (www.bacb.com).

    Mary Baldwin University also has BACB® and faculty approval for an additional two courses (a six-course sequence in total) towards eligibility for taking the Board Certification Exam to be a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). This sequence is well-suited to those in teaching, social work, mental health, criminal justice and behavioral services field. Additional requirements for eligibility to take the BCBA exam include a graduate degree in an approved field and supervised fieldwork. Mary Baldwin will work with students to assist in setting up field placement experiences, though there may be an additional required cost for private supervision of those hours. Please see the Behavior Analyst Certification Board® website for more details about degree and fieldwork requirements (www.bacb.com).

    Requirements for the BCBA course sequence

    PSYC 513 or PSYC 313 Basic Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis
    ED 592 Behavior Analysis: Measurement and Assessment
    ED 593 Ethics and Special Considerations in Behavior Analysis
    ED 594 Fundamental Elements of Behavior Change and Change procedures

    Requirements for the BCBA course sequence

    PSYC 513 Basic Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis
    ED 592 Behavior Analysis: Measurement and Assessment
    ED 593 Ethics and Special Considerations in Behavior Analysis
    ED 594 Fundamental Elements of Behavior Change and Change procedures
    ED 595 Special Topics in Behavior Analysis
    ED 596 Societal Considerations for Behavior Analysis

  • Professional (ED) Course Descriptions

    110 Practicum in Education (3 s.h.) (C)
    This course is designed to provide students who are contemplating teaching as a career to acquire early and varied experiences in area school classrooms. Students will meet several afternoons with their practicum supervisor for the practicum seminar. A minimum of 60 hours will be spent in the classroom, with the exception of RCW students, who will complete a minimum of 90 hours during May Term. Students must complete this course prior to the senior year. *Prerequisite: ED 115.

    111 Practicum in Special Education (3 s.h.) (C)
    This course is designed to give students who are contemplating a career in special education an opportunity to observe and assist teachers in the classroom. A minimum of 60 hours will be spent in the classroom, with the exception of RCW students, who will complete a minimum of 90 hours during May Term. *Prerequisite: ED 115.

    115 Foundations of Education (3 s.h.) (T)
    The goals of this introductory course are: to acquaint students with the philosophical schools of thought in education and with prominent educators whose contributions have shaped educational theory and practice; and to enhance students’ skills in reading, writing, thinking, and discussing critically and analytically. *Prerequisite for ED 110 and ED 111.

    120 Understanding Exceptional Individuals (3 s.h.)
    This course is about exceptional children and youth with learning and/or behavior problems, or who are gifted and talented, or who have physical disabilities. The course is a study of the field of special education and the exceptional individuals.

    125 Introduction to Art Education (3 s.h.) (A)
    For course description, see ART 125 in the Art and Art History, Art Education listing.

    156 Numeration and Algebra for Teachers (3 s.h.) (Q)
    For course description, see MATH 156 in the Mathematics listing.

    157 Computer Technology for Teachers (3 s.h.)
    This online course prepares teachers to use computer technology within the classroom to enhance, augment, and enlarge opportunities for learning. Offered as needed to Baldwin Online and Adult Programs students.

    158 Geometry and Measurement for Teachers (3 s.h.) (Q)
    For course description, see MATH 158 in the Mathematics listing.

    205 Characteristics of Exceptionality (3 s.h.)
    Students demonstrate knowledge of definitions, characteristics, and learning and behavior support needs of children and youth with disabilities, including learning disabilities, emotional disturbance, mental retardation, developmental delay, autism, traumatic brain injury, attention deficit disorders, other health impairments, and multiple disabilities, among others. They develop understanding of normal patterns of development (physical, psycho-motor, cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional) and educational implications of various disabilities.

    212 Lifespan Human Development (3 s.h.)
    Lifespan Human Development meets the MDCHS admissions requirement and also meets the Virginia DOE licensure requirement for 3 hours of human growth and development coursework. This course will focus on theory, philosophy, and research on learning and human development from birth through late adulthood, as well as real-life applications in these areas through experiential projects and related assignments. Topics include physical, psychosocial, emotional, cognitive, language, and gender development in family, school, peer, and work contexts.

    215 Foundations and Legal Issues of Special Education (3 s.h.)
    Prospective teachers learn the foundation for educating students with disabilities, including: historical perspectives, theories and philosophies, and current trends in the field of special education. They develop an understanding and application of legal aspects and regulatory requirements associated with the identification, education and evaluations of disabled students. Emphasizes ability to analyze ethical issues and to apply accepted standards of professional behavior.

    218 Transitioning in the Special Education Environment (1 s.h.)
    This course is a requirement for students who are seeking teacher licensure with an endorsement in Special Education. Focus will be on development of skills and knowledge in preparation for working with parents and families to provide post-secondary transitions as well as transitions while in school, case management, consultation and collaboration. Emphasis will be on transition planning in the IEP — Individualized Education Plan, transition system delivery, independent living skills, career development, community resources, available agencies, self-advocacy, guardianship, and implementation of inter-agency agreements for successful transitioning to employment and self-sustainment. Students will develop an understanding of the best practices in transitioning, the Model of Transition Pathways, transition assessment, Federal Legislation, transition provisions in IDEA 2004, NCLB 2001, and alignment of transition with Standards-Based Education. Participants will learn how to become a transition leader for their students when they are a Special Education teacher, and they will know how to improve transition outcomes during the school years as well as postsecondary for youth with disabilities and for youth placed at risk.

    230 Engaging PK-8 Students in Science (2 s.h.)
    This course will focus on the teaching and learning of science through inquiry. With an inquiry approach, students in grades PK-8 are engaged in their own learning as they search for answers and solve problems through hands-on, minds-on investigations. Students learn best when they do science in the context of their own environments and when science is integrated across the curriculum. This course will model such an inquiry-based science classroom that includes real and relevant content; inside & outside studies; project-based unit planning; scientific tools and technology; diverse learner strategies; and alternative/authentic assessments.

    300 Elementary School Methods and Practicum (4 s.h.)
    Conceptualizes the teacher as one who makes and carries out decisions about curriculum and instruction, based on principles of teaching and learning. Instructional planning and classroom management are emphasized. A 30 hour field experience in a PK-6 classroom integrates theory with practice. NOTE: If pursuing licensure, must be fully accepted into an Education program in order to register for this course. Other students must obtain instructor permission. Prerequisite for student teaching.

    305 Classroom Management and Collaboration in Special Education Setting (3 s.h.)
    Prospective teachers learn classroom and behavior management techniques and individual interventions, develop skills required to collaborate with regular education colleagues and with families of students with disabilities, learn and practice skills in consultation, case management, and collaboration needed to assist and support students and families in successful transitions within the K-12 school system and beyond.

    308 Field Experience: ESL (3 s.h.)
    This course serves as the 300 hour field experience (150 direct instructional hours) for individuals adding ESL to an existing license or pursuing an ESL endorsement concurrently with another endorsement.

    310 Middle and Secondary Methods and Practicum (4 s.h.) (R)
    Experience with methods and materials for grades 6-12. They demonstrate knowledge and skills in setting goals and objectives, unit and lesson planning, varying teaching techniques, classroom management, individualizing instruction, measuring and evaluating learning, selecting teaching materials, using multimedia, and developing an effective teaching style and confidence in speaking. A 30 hour field experience in a grade 6-12 classroom integrates theory with practice. NOTE: If pursuing licensure, must be fully accepted into an Education program in order to register for this course. Other students must obtain instructor permission. *Prerequisite for student teaching.

    315 Differentiated Strategies in Instruction and Assessment for Special Education and Practicum (4 s.h.)
    Students learn service delivery models, curriculum, instruction of students with disabilities, and skills for application. Includes alternative ways to teach content, curriculum adaptation and modification, strategies for integration of students with disabilities with non-disabled peers, uses of technology in learning. Examines procedures to develop, provide, and evaluate instruction consistent with students’ individual needs: procedures for screening, prereferral, referral, eligibility determination. Considers factors that may influence assessment findings, related ethical issues, application of results to guide development of individual education plans. Required 30 hour practicum. NOTE: If pursuing licensure, must be fully accepted into an Education program in order to register for this course. Other students must obtain instructor permission. *Prerequisite for student teaching.

    323 Language Acquisition and Reading I (3 s.h.)
    This course will develop in beginning elementary teachers a thorough understanding of the complex nature of language acquisition and literacy, including but not limited to phonemic awareness, concept of print, phonics, vocabulary development, and comprehension. Students will investigate formal and informal diagnostic measures, instructional procedures, and corrective strategies for varied reading difficulties. Students will develop knowledge of reading and writing processes, compelling theories of reading and writing pedagogy including strategies for working with English language learners. Students will become familiar with criteria for identifying excellence in children’s literature and elements of a balanced literacy program which includes a variety of literature and independent reading.

    324 Language Acquisition and Reading II and Practicum (4 s.h.)
    Learning to read and write is a developmental process that can be systematically advanced through the use of specific instructional strategies. This course will provide beginning elementary teachers the knowledge and skills required to recognize, assess, and respond to children’s learning needs as emerging readers and writers. Students will examine various strategies including but not limited to word study, phonics, vocabulary, and spelling designed to accelerate progress in children who encounter reading difficulties. Students will also explore learning opportunities for children who are moving along in the reading continuum more rapidly than their classmates. Strategies for drawing children into literature and utilizing authentic children’s books in reading instruction are included. Students will field test literacy strategies introduced in the ED 323/324 sequence in a 30-hour practicum placement in the semester in which they are enrolled in ED 324.

    325 Classroom and Behavior Management (3 s.h.)
    This course presents behavioral, cognitive, and psycho-educational theories along with behavior management strategies and positive behavior intervention plans. Emphasis will include current research on behavior management in the classroom for grades K-12, cognitive restructuring for the social cognitive approach, and current practices. Strategies for learning how to help students with intrinsic motivation will be taught. These strategies can enable students to remain in control of their behavior and make positive choices. Focus will be on teaching students to perceive situations in an appropriate manner which will change their thought patterns regarding social situations and assist them in becoming efficient problem solvers. This focus views students as change agents whereby teachers guide them to manage their own behavior change as well as their own behavior patterns. Research has shown that these strategies have significant impact on interpersonal conflicts within the educational setting. Students will examine the structure of effectively managed whole group classrooms as well as individual behavior management and the development of social behaviors. Response measures will be presented for use in data analysis for behavior management within the classroom. Participants will development a behavior management plan for their classroom which incorporates management plans needed for individual students as they utilize skills for enhancing a supportive learning environment.

    328 Assessment of and for Learning (3 s.h.)
    In this course on understanding and using assessment to measure and improve K–12 student learning, students will explore the types and purposes of assessments used in today’s classrooms. Students will learn how to define expectations/objectives, select and develop appropriate assessment tools, modify assessment practices for individual needs, read and interpret standardized test scores, reflect upon student learning outcomes, and make appropriate inferences and instructional decisions based upon assessment data.

    341 Linguistics for ESL Teachers (3 s.h.)
    This course provides teacher education students with an overview of the development of language in the context of culture and historical concepts. The historical development of language (English and other languages) is reviewed. Students will understand the basic principles and methodologies of linguistic science, while learning how to discuss language issues in an informed way with linguists and non-linguists. The course will address basic foundations of linguistics in order to prepare teachers who may be working with ESL students, or who may be teaching language arts/literacy/English in the K–12 classroom.

    342 Culturally Responsive Teaching and Communication (3 s.h.) (D)
    This course examines multicultural education through a focus on the historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations of education. Special emphasis is placed on the role of ethnicity in the development of the United States and its education system. Includes an overview of multicultural/multilingual curricula with a special focus on culturally/linguistically-responsive instruction and assessment techniques.

    343 ESL Assessment and Curriculum Design (3 s.h.)
    This course is designed to prepare teachers to provide linguistically and culturally appropriate assessment for English Language Learners (ELLs) in grades K–12, focusing on utilizing assessment to design appropriate curricula. Students will also learn about the foundational issues and historical development of ESL instruction in the U.S.

    344 Literacy Instruction for ESL Students (3 s.h.)
    This course provides an overview of second language (L2) methods and materials, focusing specifically on the teaching and learning of L2 literacy skills: reading and writing. Additional attention will be given to vocabulary and grammar. Class sessions will focus on theory and practice related to these four important components of language learning. In addition, students will critique popular 12 textbooks currently in use around the world, evaluate already developed lesson plans, develop lesson plans of their own, engage in short demonstration lessons that showcase state-of-the-art teaching techniques, and complete a literature review on a topic of personal interest.

    345 Methods of ESL Instruction and Practicum (4 s.h.)
    This course examines classroom assessment and instructional best practices useful for meeting the needs of a diverse student population in grades K–12, in particular the needs of students whose primary language is not English. This course includes a 30-hour field experience/practicum.

    350 Content Area Reading (3 s.h.)
    This course requires students to examine research and instructional subjects concentrating on high school students and adults. Students design experiences that examine uses of content area texts capitalizing on critical reading and writing. Course participants will field test all activities described and studied in this course.

    Student Teaching Courses (12 s.h. each)
    Student teaching requires one semester working directly with students in a classroom on a full-time basis, for a minimum of 12 weeks under the direction of a classroom teacher and college supervisor. For students seeking endorsement in Art, Music or Special Education, the student teaching experience shall be split into 8 weeks in an elementary setting and 8 weeks in a secondary setting, to total a 16-week placement. Student teachers may not work, take courses, or participate in varsity sports. Application must be made the semester prior to student teaching. *Please see the Requirements for Approval to Student Teach section above.

    382 Elementary Education (PK–6) (O)
    383 Middle Education (6–8) (O)
    384 Secondary Education (6–12) (O)
    385 Student Teaching in Art Education (PK–12) (O)
    389 Student Teaching in Foreign Language (PK–12) (O)
    391 Student Teaching in Theatre (PK–12) (O)
    392 Student Teaching in Music Education (PK–12) (O)
    393 Student Teaching in Special Education (K–12) (O)

    386 Student Teaching Seminar (2 s.h.)
    Seminar is held in conjunction with student teaching. This experience allows students to discuss and examine critical issues related to student teaching. Spring semester only for RCW students.

    400 Senior Seminar and Project (3 s.h.) (M)
    This course is the capstone course for the Liberal Arts and Educational Studies Major. In this course, students will demonstrate a clear understanding of the pedagogy and processes involved in teaching elementary school students. An action research project associated with student teaching or other elementary classroom experience will be required. RCW students are expected to take ED 400 while student teaching. Baldwin Online and Adult Programs students may choose to take ED 400 the term immediately prior, during, or immediately following student teaching. . Prerequisites (or co-requisites): ED 300 or ED 315.

    ED 510/511/512/513/514 Practicum (.5 s.h.)
    The practicum experience is designed for MAT students who are preparing to teach. This experience provides them with an opportunity to observe and assist teachers in the classroom, and to understand the ethical issues and the practice of accepted standards of professional behavior.

    ED 520 Applied Behavior Analysis Practicum (variable s.h.)
    Students will be engaged in a series of practicum activities designed to develop understanding of concepts, theories, and research related to the field of Applied Behavior Analysis. Students will learn to design and evaluate a program for behavior change while understanding the procedures for establishing desired behaviors and reducing unhealthy and maladaptive behaviors, and apply this to a real setting.

    ED 577 Special Topics in Graduate Study (credit varies)
    On an occasional basis, this course is offered to a student(s) to explore topics related to graduate education.

    ED 592 Behavior Analysis: Measurement and Assessment (3 s.h.)
    This graduate-level 45-hour course covers the basic concepts and principles of measurement and experimental design, as it relates to the profession of applied behavioral analysis. The present course covers tasks from the content areas of B. Measurement and the Basic Behavior Analytic Skills of Measurement and Experimental Design as outlined in the BACB’s Fourth Edition Task List. Specific emphasis will be given to: 1) selecting proper measurement systems to obtain data in an applied setting, 2) designing and implementing observational measurement systems, and 3) different methods for evaluating interventions to determine effectiveness.

    ED 593 Ethics and Special Considerations in Behavior Analysis (3 s.h.)
    This graduate-level 45-hour course covers both the ethical standards surrounding the professional field of behavior analysis as well as the key concepts related to the implementation of assessment and intervention. This class emphasizes the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct (BACB) as well as content from the areas of: A. Identification of the Problem, C. Assessment, D. Intervention, and E. Implementation, Management, and Supervision (from the BACB Fourth Edition Task List). Behavioral Change Considerations (TC:01-TC:03) and Behavior Change Systems (TS:01-TS:08) are also reviewed. Upon completion of the class, the student will have an understanding of both the ethical standards and the application of these standards and the concepts, as well as the applications necessary for both successful interventions and assessment across a variety of settings.

    ED 594 Fundamental Elements of Behavior Change and Change Procedures (3 s.h.)
    This graduate 45-hour course covers in depth concepts, principles, and processes related to the elements of behavior change. Specific consideration is given to: 1) the appropriate use of reinforcement, 2) the concepts of shaping and chaining, 3) the proper use of mand, tact, intraverbal, and listener training, 4) the use of differential reinforcement, 5) discrimination procedures, 6) using interventions based on antecedents, and 7) errorless learning procedures.   This class emphasizes the content areas of Fundamental Elements of Behavior Change (TE-01 to TE-21) and Specific Behavior Change Procedures (TP-01 to TP-13) from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s Fourth Edition Task List.

    ED 595 Special Topics in Behavior Analysis (3 s.h.)
    This graduate 45-hour course covers in depth concepts, principles, and processes related to the elements of behavior change. Specific consideration is given to measurement and data analysis, experimental design, behavior change systems, intervention, implementation, management, and supervision within behavior analysis. This class emphasizes the content from the: A. Identification of the Problem, C. Assessment, D. Intervention, and  E. Implementation, Management, and Supervision as well as B. Measurement and the Basic Behavior Analytic Skills of Measurement and Experimental Design as outlined in the BACB’s Fourth Edition Task List (from the BACB Fourth Edition Task List). Behavioral Change Considerations (TC:01-TC:03) and Behavior Change Systems (TS:01-TS:08) are also reviewed.

    ED 596 Societal Considerations for Behavior Analysis (3 s.h.)
    This graduate 45-hour course covers in depth concepts, principles, and processes related to the elements of behavior change.  This class emphasizes the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct (BACB) as well as discretionary content.  Upon completion of the class, the student will have an understanding of both the ethical standards and application of these standards and the concepts, and will also have reviewed a number of ethical dilemmas that will aid in their future ethical conduct as behavior analysts.

    ED 601 Inquiry into Human Growth, Development, and Diversity (3 s.h.)
    Normal patterns of human development during the K-12 school years, including the theoretical, pragmatic and complex nature of language acquisition, and socio-emotional well-being of K-12 students are studied. Variations in physical, socio-cultural, ethnic, religious in the contexts of schools, families (e.g. the effects of daycare and divorce), and society, as a whole, are studied through difference and similarities. Developmental patterns for at-risk populations, students with disabilities and identified gifted students as related to age, level of involvement and effect on learning are examined. Intervention strategies grounded in current research will focus on successful learning for K-12 students.

    ED 602 Meaning and Purpose: The Foundations of Education (3 s.h.)
    Historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations underlying the role of education in the United States are studied. Contemporary issues such as multicultural understanding, citizenship, moral education, and critical thinking are examined.

    ED 603 Thoughtful Assessment (3 s.h.)
    Methods of assessing student learning are discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the centrality of accurate assessment in designing learning approached for groups of diverse learners. Current trends and issues in assessment, such as standardized tests, high-stakes testing, and school accountability will be discussed.

    ED 605 An Integrated Approach to Language Arts (3 s.h.)
    Students learn effective language arts instruction of reading and writing and how to regard the language arts (reading, writing, speaking, listening, and literature study) as an integrated whole, including research and theory for instructing students with special needs. Students investigate reading disability and interventions. Explores a balanced approach to teaching reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Emphasizes federal policy regarding effective reading instruction through phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension, as well as current assessment practices for differentiation to meet learner’s developmental and educational needs, and developmental stages of spelling and vocabulary development are emphasized. Examines flexible grouping, small group instruction, collaborative planning, reflective practice, the domains of teaching writing, including composing, written expression, usage and mechanics, and the writing process of planning, drafting, revising, editing, and sharing.

    ED 606 An Inquiry Approach to Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Area (3 s.h.)
    Explores reading to comprehend and learning with text, whether printed or digital, and how teachers assist in these processes, including the complex nature of language acquisition and reading and their impact on content comprehension. Addresses fostering appreciation for a wide variety of literature, methods for determining independent reading levels, and examines basic reading skills (such as phonemic awareness, understanding of sound/symbol relationships, phonics instruction, syllables, phonemes, morphemes, decoding skills, and word attack skills) and their influence on students’ ability to comprehend content area curriculum. Addresses assessment of students’ comprehension strategies and creating instructional procedures. Understanding narrative and expository texts used in sciences, social sciences and humanities builds a repertoire of instructional strategies, including questioning, summarizing and retelling skills, and strategies in literal, interpretive, critical, and evaluative comprehension to help K-12 students learn independently.

    ED 607 Instructional Strategies for Inquiry-Based Classrooms (3 s.h.)
    Students develop pedagogical skills in the areas of classroom management, differentiating instructional goals and objectives, writing lesson and unit plans, and assessing student progress. Graduate students develop a range of instructional options from which to choose when working in heterogeneous classrooms. Using current standards of learning (SOLs), curriculum criteria, and scoring rubrics, students focus on the learning tasks by planning effective lessons and developing criteria, assessments and tests appropriate to the children’s interests and levels of development.

    ED 608 Field Experience: Elementary, Special Education, or ESL (3 s.h.)
    This is a 300-hour classroom experience (150 hours must involve direct instruction) for licensed teachers seeking to add-on an endorsement in either Elementary, Special Education for the General Curriculum, or ESL. Students receive mentored practice in planning, instructing and assessing student learning. In addition, they develop an understanding of the ethical issues and the practice of accepted standards of professional behavior and legal factors applied to exceptional students in the general curriculum.

    ED 609 Student Teaching: Elementary (6 s.h.)
    A (minimum) 12-week classroom placement requires full classroom teacher responsibility for a minimum of five consecutive weeks, and accumulates a total of 300 hours with a minimum of 150 clock hours of direct instruction within the grade level range of the endorsement area sought. Students receive mentored practice in planning, instructing and assessing student learning, as well as the ethical issues and accepted standards of professional behavior.

    ED 610 Student Teaching: Middle and Secondary Grades (6 s.h.)
    A (minimum) 12-week classroom placement requires full classroom teacher responsibility for a minimum of five consecutive weeks, a total of 300 hours with a minimum of 150 of direct instruction.

    ED 611 Seminar (2 s.h.)
    Students explore with peers the insights and understandings they gain in the Student Teaching (ED609/610/614) or Professional Development Project (ED612). During the seminar students critically analyze their own teaching through written and oral presentations. *ED 611 is to be taken concurrently with ED 609/610/614 or ED612.

    ED 612 Professional Development Project (3 s.h.)
    In lieu of student teaching (for teachers who hold a collegiate professional license), students choose among options for their professional development: a classroom research project, a supervision project, or a self-designed project. The project is planned with the student’s advisor and presented to a committee of three from the graduate faculty. *Prerequisite: IN 630.

    ED 613 Reflective Synthesis Project (1 s.h.)
    In a final paper graduating students reflect on and analyze their entire MAT experience, including course work, practica, and student teaching. They synthesize their understanding of what it means to be an inquiring teacher, both conceptually and practically, who cultivates inquiry in K-12 students. *ED 613 is to be taken concurrently with ED 609/610/614 or ED 612.

    ED 614 Student Teaching: Special Education for the General Curriculum (6 s.h.)
    A 12-week (minimum) classroom placement requires full classroom teacher responsibility for a minimum of five consecutive weeks, and accumulates a total of 300 hours with a minimum of 150 clock hours of direct instruction. Students receive mentored practice in ethical issues, accepted standards of professional behavior, planning, instructing and assessing student learning. Addresses assessment, evaluation, differentiated instruction, best practices, and technology to promote K-12 student learning within the scope and sequence of the general curriculum while addressing individualized needs and implementing IEPs.

    ED 615 Gifted Education Field Experience (1 s.h.)
    For certified teachers seeking an add-on endorsement in Gifted Education, this practicum/field experience includes 45 instructional hours of successful teaching experience with gifted students in a heterogeneously grouped (mixed ability) classroom or a homogeneously grouped (single ability) classroom. Students receive mentored practice in planning, instructing and assessing student learning, developing an understanding of ethical issues and accepted standards of professional behavior.

    ED 616 Nature Journaling Across The Curriculum (3 s.h.)
    Educators study a variety of journaling techniques and artistic medium for observing and documenting the natural world, including the use of field sketching, map making, daily logs, data collection, observational notes, and writing for reflection. The course is designed to: 1) introduce educators to strategies for improving the artistic, written and reflective abilities of K-12 students using nature experiences; 2) encourage educators to use the outdoors around the school and community as sites for nature-related observation, documentation, and artistic/written expression; and 3) help educators develop school-based curriculum strategies for integrating art with science and writing through nature journaling.

    ED 617 Math in the Garden (3 s.h.)
    Educators learn how to use the garden and local environment to teach standards-based math skills to students in grades K–8. Math concepts from basic operations to geometry and data analysis are covered. The course includes field trips to gardens and natural areas for implementation practice.

    ED 618 Natural Research: Plant and Animal Studies in the Outdoors (3 s.h.)
    The goal of this course is to help educators get their students “wild about science.” Using wildlife and habitat studies as the focus, the course provides elementary, middle and high school educators the skills needed to work with students as they design and perform their own field-based investigations related to the local environment. Educators will participate in plant and animal studies, ask questions and develop plans for finding answers, observe and collect data in natural settings, and present results and conclusions. Participants will plan curriculum for effective “environment-based learning” instruction by implementing strategies and techniques presented in class. The course will address learning standards for all grade levels.

    ED 619 Trout In The Classroom (3 s.h.)
    Educators learn to implement the science-based curriculum, Trout in the Classroom (TIC) developed through the conservation organization, Trout Unlimited. In TIC programs, students in grades K–12 raise trout from eggs, monitor tank water quality, engage in stream habitat study, and release their trout in a local state-approved stream. The course focuses on integrating TIC across the curriculum, finding resource support and funding, and tank set-up and maintenance. Field experiences include stream/watershed studies, data collection and field technology practice, and fisheries biology.

    ED 620 The Outdoor Classroom: EBL Program Development, Implementation and Evaluation (3 s.h.)
    A variety of pedagogical issues related to environment-based learning (EBL) are studied, including: outdoor learning methods, management of students and materials, program and student assessment, working with special needs students and diverse populations in the outdoors, lesson planning, technology, curriculum resource development, area mapping, and schoolyard habitat development and management.

    ED 621 Storytelling: A Pathway to Curriculum Integration (3 s.h.)
    The oral tradition of storytelling provides a window into the context of culture and environment; the process addresses content standards in language arts, science, and social studies. Educators come to understand how to use this timeless tradition as a tool for motivating student learning while enhancing the oral and writing abilities of K–12 students. Students learn to observe, reflect upon and document their own sense of place in time.

    ED 622 An Integrated Approach to Exceptionality (3 s.h.)
    Characteristics of students with learning disabilities, emotional disturbance, intellectual disabilities, developmental delays, autism, traumatic brain injury, multiple disabilities, giftedness, overlapping exceptionalities. These and other health impairments are studied across age-span/developmental issues, levels of severity, cognitive functioning, language development, emotional and behavioral adjustment, social development, related medical aspects impacting learning, and cultural/ethnic and socioeconomic factors. Various forms of communication including verbal, non-verbal, and written; skill development in understanding the dynamic influence of the family system and cultural/environmental milieu as applied to the education of exceptional students and emphasis on case management and collaboration with other entities, including students, parents, general education teachers, administrators, paraprofessionals and agencies responsible for implementing IEPs on the continuum of placements. Practical applications of service delivery, curriculum, and instruction related to exceptional learners is explored.

    ED 623 Advanced Studies of Gifted Learners (3 s.h.)
    With historical background in gifted education, students develop a deep understanding and appreciation for the cognitive, social, and emotional characteristics of gifted learners and skills in meeting associated educational needs of these gifted learners. Multiple perspectives on intelligence are discussed with current issues in the field of gifted education, including: alternative approaches to identification for special populations of gifted learners and meeting needs of gifted learners with multiple exceptionalities. Advocacy skills for gifted, identification, holistic assessment, appropriate models and strategies, alternative programs and options in delivering appropriate services are emphasized.

    ED 624 An Inquiry Approach to Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction (3 s.h.)
    Recognizing that students in today’s classrooms are widely diverse, attention is given to the scope and sequence of the general education curriculum (including the Standards of Learning and the state accountability system) and to strategies to promote successful integration of students with disabilities with their non-disabled peers. Included: the use of technology to support learning, strategies to develop, provide and evaluate instruction consistent with students’ individual needs (including educational implications of various disabilities). Diverse learning needs for all students, including exceptional learners, through curriculum development and differentiation, skill development plans, individual assessment strategies, and flexible planning and grouping strategies are studied. Environmental factors, connections among conceptual, curricular and social/emotional issues, effective strategies for working collaboratively with professionals, parents/families and students in and with other school settings are addressed.

    ED 625 Classroom And Behavioral Management: Theory And Practice (3 s.h.)
    Theories and practices associated with establishing, implementing, and maintaining classroom and behavioral management procedures are emphasized, along with preventing behavior problems and modifying classroom environments to enhance student learning. Response to Intervention theory (RTI) and strategies are included. Participants develop and analyze specific techniques to increase positive behavior and decrease inappropriate behavior that affects learning. Methods of behavioral/environmental assessment are addressed.

    ED 626 Chesapeake Classrooms (3 s.h.)
    This course is provided in partnership with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF). Educators choose from any of the five-day Chesapeake Classroom summer sessions offered by CBF (www.cbf.org/chesapeakeclassrooms) and complete the Mary Baldwin requirements. Chesapeake Classrooms equips educators with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to include the environment in the K–12 curriculum and involve students in outdoor learning. Educators explore the watershed and examine the connection between land-use and water quality through hands-on, standards-based investigations and action projects. Note: Mary Baldwin students must be accepted into the Chesapeake Classrooms program before registering for this course.

    ED 627 Collaboration and Transitions for Exceptional Students (3 s.h.)
    Understanding the educational process of transitions from childhood to adulthood for exceptional students, including developing independent living skills, pre-vocational and career skills, self-advocacy/self-determination skills, and pursuit of post-secondary education is studied with legal and regulatory components related to transition planning within the IEP, including the provision of transition services and effective models of instruction for secondary transition. Strategies to develop and foster family and professional partnerships honoring diversity and culture, while emphasizing the role of collaborative planning in the preparation and delivery of developmentally appropriate services for exceptional learners is explored through collaboration with all stakeholders — students, families, teachers, related service providers, paraprofessionals, and other school staff — to develop communication and leadership skills conducive to implementing quality student programs.

    ED 628 Reading on the River (3 s.h.)
    In this course, educators learn to build upon students’ natural curiosities to develop an environment-based literacy program for students in grades K–12. By connecting research-supported literacy instruction to experiences in the outdoors, educators can create reading and writing activities that are relevant and motivational for students. In the course, educators study pedagogical skills and strategies that align instruction to local and state literacy standards. Methods, resources, and technology for teaching foundational reading skills and for using informational text, literature, writing, and assessments are explored.

    ED 629 The Trail to Every Classroom (3 s.h.)
    This course is offered in partnership with the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and the National Park Service to provide graduate credit for the high-quality professional development program, The Trail to Every Classroom (TTEC). The TTEC course provides K-12 educators with the tools and training needed to implement a place-based curriculum and to conduct service-learning with students on the Appalachian Trail (A.T.). During the course, educators develop their own experiential learning curriculum based on state educational standards that integrate a hands-on study of the A.T. The TTEC program goals are to: engage youth in volunteer activities; encourage a love of learning; promote healthy lifestyles; create a conservation ethic; and to form a respect for the Appalachian Trail. Note: Mary Baldwin students must be accepted into the TTEC program before registering for this course.

    ED 631 Technologies to Advance Learning (3 s.h.)
    The application of contemporary technologies to advance teaching and learning is studied. Students explore a wide variety of media and technological resources develop learning plans that demonstrate an understanding and application of the course objectives.

    ED 632 Inquiry Research Project (3 s.h.)
    Students work with their assigned project chair to identify a research question and develop a project for investigation. Through comprehensive scholarly study, the student presents conclusions that offer innovation or resolution to their research question to a faculty panel. *Prerequisite: IN 630.

    Special note about ED 632: Students not completing ED 632 within the semester will be required to maintain ongoing enrollment in ED 732, a 1 semester hour continuance/extension of the course, and will be billed accordingly per semester that the student continues work on the project. Students may choose to not enroll during summer months, provided that the student does not plan to use college resources (including faculty support) on the project and provided that the student does not plan to defend in the summer. If the student plans to work with their project chair or defend the project during the summer, the student must first check with the project chair to make sure that they are available to do so. The student must be enrolled during all Fall and Spring semesters until completing and defending the project. The student must be enrolled in ED 632 or ED 732 during the semester that the project is defended. If a semester of enrollment is skipped (other than summer) prior to completing the project, a grade of “F” will be entered for ED 632 and the course will need to be retaken at the full 3 s.h. tuition rate.

    ED 640 Characteristics and Assessment of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3 s.h.)
    This is the first of four courses in the proposed 12-credit Autism Certificate Program. This course provides an overview of autism and related developmental disabilities across the lifespan, including Asperger Syndrome and other pervasive developmental disorders. The course will cover assessment, diagnostic criteria and identification, characteristics, collaboration with families, an overview of educational impact and trends, transitioning to adulthood, controversial topics regarding etiology and treatment, and an overview of national and state resources.

    ED 641 Communication, Language, and Sensory Aspects of Autism Spectrum Disorders (3 s.h.)
    This is the second of four courses in the 12-credit Autism Certificate Program. This course provides students with an overview of typical language acquisition and development as compared with students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The course emphasizes the visual aspects of language learning as well as the notion of “communication as behavior” and addresses the role of assistive and augmentative communication technologies to support individuals on the Spectrum. Additionally, this course introduces students to the common sensory integration issues often associated with Autism. The course provides classroom strategies for supporting individualized sensory and communication needs of children who have Autism Spectrum Disorders, including an introduction to applied behavioral analysis techniques used for language development and collaboration with families and related service providers, as well as focusing on the importance of teaching skill-generalization across multiple settings and situations. *Prerequisite: ED 640.

    ED 642 Social Sills Instruction and Behavior Strategies for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3 s.h.)
    This is the third of four courses in the 12-credit Autism Certificate Program. This course provides students with an overview of typical social and behavioral development as compared with students with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The course emphasizes the role of functional behavior assessments and applied behavioral techniques as related to addressing challenging or inappropriate behaviors that may be exhibited by persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Additionally, the course addresses social skill deficits that persons with Autism may have and provides instructional strategies and techniques to address these issues in the classroom using methods that are purposeful and individualized, including the role of peers. This course will focus on collaboration with families and related service providers, as well as the importance of teaching skill-generalization across multiple settings and situations. *Prerequisite: ED 640.

    ED 643 Practicum Experience: Autism Spectrum Disorders (3 s.h.)
    This practicum experience concludes the four-course program for the 12-credit Autism Certificate. It is intended to be a culminating experience so that students have an opportunity to concretely demonstrate skills, techniques, and strategies learned in the previous three courses. This course requires that students complete a practicum experience (minimum of 70 in-class hours) in a setting that serves children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. This could include a self-contained setting, and inclusive setting, or a combination of the two; the population served must be between the ages of 2 and 21, inclusive. Students enrolled in the course will meet three times during the semester to process experiences, share ideas, and engage in inquiry-based discussion. This is in addition to ongoing on-line requirements. *Prerequisites (or co-requisites): ED 640, ED 641, and ED 642.

    ED 651 Structure, Power, and Freedom: Perspectives on U.S. Higher Education (3 s.h.)
    This course will acquaint students with the history, purposes, origins, structures, and challenges of the complex system of post-secondary education in the U.S. The course will consider the different uses to which higher education has been applied. We will examine the European roots of American higher education and will explore a broad array of issues, controversies, traditions, and reforms.

    ED 652 Adult Development: Emerging Adulthood and Beyond (3 s.h.)
    This course considers the developmental psychology of adults, beginning with the transition from late adolescence into emerging adulthood and continuing through five definitive stages of maturation through senescence. Included in this course is an overview of the tenets of developmental psychology and the theorists most noted for the foundations of the discipline. Students will apply developmental theory to the five domains of adult functioning, focusing on physical change, cognitive change, family and gender roles, work roles, personality and meaning, and relationships in each of these dimensions. Included in the discussions will be the effect of stress on healthy adult development.

    ED 653 The History of Adult Education (3 s.h.)
    The purpose of this course is to guide students through the development and history of adult education outside of the traditional institutions from a global perspective. It will review the concepts of higher learning throughout history, from ancient classical civilizations to present day. It is designed to address not only traditional educational programs, but also the numerous issues that have influenced the expansion of adult education such as literacy development, career and professional training, GED programs, etc. The course will pay special attention to adult education program developed for diverse populations. While focusing mostly on adult education programs in the United States, students will have the opportunity to become acquainted with programs in other countries and cultures.

    ED 654 Special Topics in Adult and Higher Education (3 s.h.)
    The purpose of this course is for students to explore a topic related to Adult and Higher Education in depth. The topics will rotate on a regular basis (at least annually) so that students will have an element of choice in what topic they would like to explore further. Sample topics for the course include: Multiculturalism/Diversity in Higher Education; College Administration and Student Affairs; Marketing, Recruitment, and Retention; The American Community College; Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives; Curriculum Design and Planning in Higher Education. There may also be opportunities for such a course to be centered on educational travel to a domestic or international location to explore further dimensions of adult and higher education beyond our local community. With all topics, students will be given assignments to demonstrate their reflection and analysis of how these course experiences relate to historical, philosophical, cultural, and political aspects of the field.

    ED 655 Internship in Adult and Higher Education (3 s.h.)
    The purpose of this course is for students to experience workplace environments in adult and/or higher education. Students will complete a minimum of 120 hours working in such a setting (at least 20 of which need to be in a second setting or second type of experience). Students who are currently employed in adult and higher education will need to complete a minimum of 20 of these hours in another office or capacity to broaden their experience. Students will be given assignments to demonstrate their reflection and analysis of how these experiences relate to philosophical, cultural, and political aspects of the field.

    ED 732 MEd Inquiry Research Project Extension (1 s.h., audited, changing to 2 s.h. in Spring 2015)
    Students who need to complete ED 632 must register for this extension course during all Fall and Spring semesters following the semester in which ED 632 was taken until they have completed and defended their project. If students plan to work with their project chair or defend their project during the summer, they must also register for one session during Summer, after confirming the availability of their project chair. ED 732 will appear on the transcript as an audit only. ED 732 may be taken for a maximum of three semesters. If the student has not defended his or her thesis at that time, the student receives a W grade for ED 632 and 732, and is withdrawn from the program. The student may apply for readmission, but must include a proposal outlining the timeline for completing the project. If the student is readmitted, he or she must begin again by taking ED 632. NOTE: As of Spring 2015, ED 732 will change from being a 1 semester hour course, to being a 2 semester hour course. Offered every term. Fee: per hour semester.

    Inquiry (IN) Course Descriptions

    IN 577 Special Topics in Graduate Study (Credit varies)
    On an occasional basis, this course is offered to a student(s) to explore topics related to graduate education.

    IN 601 Inquiry in Mathematics (3 s.h.)
    This course is designed to emphasize reasoning in mathematics, as applied to solving problems and as used in the logical development of mathematical systems. Topics, processes, and problems are selected from elementary to middle school learners. The focus will be on strategies and methods for planning and teaching. Operational definitions of various strategies and methods will be presented and modeled in order to bring about a more thorough understanding of school mathematics. Constructivist theory, NCTM standards, VA Standards of Learning and meaningful mathematical tasks will guide the presentations in this course. Students will examine, analyze and construct meaning of mathematical ideas by working collaboratively, responding to ideas, using manipulatives, making presentations, creating lessons, and providing analysis of lessons. Students are involved in solving problems and in presenting, explaining, and defending their solution strategies.*Prerequisite: College Algebra.

    IN 603 Inquiry in Social Science (3 s.h.)
    Questions social scientists ask about the human experience, institutions and interactions, and the methods of inquiry used to investigate those questions are studied. Conceptual themes include economic development and geography, (including political systems, cultural themes, and physical characteristics both nationally and globally). The range of understandings and skills K-12 students should develop when participating in these investigations are explored. The course cultivates a conceptual framework for graduate students to plan and teach geography and economics.

    IN 605 Inquiry in Natural Science (3 s.h.)
    Students investigate the nature of science and processes for acquiring scientific knowledge. Multiple branches of Natural Sciences are explored through readings, discussions, activities and investigations. Guided discovery of teaching science, involving hands-on experiments and active-learning techniques, emphasizes the learning and teaching of science. Students examine ways to integrate inquiry-based science across the curriculum, assess active science, use science education tools and technology, and address the diverse characteristics of students and their learning environments.

    IN 607 Inquiry in the Humanities (3 s.h.)
    Student knowledge of culture’s legacy of creative endeavor utilizes materials from philosophy, literature (including literature for children), and history for exploring human creativity and developing the capacity for aesthetic judgment. Students learn to examine their own beliefs, respond to literature, discuss controversial topics, and communicate complex ideas. Writing and communication skills are strengthened, and the practice of intellectual inquiry while offering experience in designing instructional strategies for K-12 learners is modeled.

    IN 609 Inquiry in the Arts (3 s.h.)
    Students understand and interpret both visual and performing arts using formal and contextual analysis. Presents understanding and appreciating art (1) as formal constructions in which meaning resides in selection and arrangement of materials or processes particular to the art form, and (2) as the expressions of cultures, eras and makers with distinctive qualities of mind and spirit, and distinctive interpretations of the nature and experience of humankind. The nature of creativity, goals of arts education, and integrating arts across the curriculum are emphasized.

    IN 620 Inquiry into the Legal and Political Processes of Exceptionality (3 s.h.)
    Historical and current foundations for legal and regulatory requirements influencing educational programs for students with a wide range of exceptionalities are explored. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Javits Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Virginia Comprehensive Services Act and No Child Left Behind are considered. Current regulations governing special education, including disciplinary policies, alternative placements along the continuum, rights and responsibilities of students, parents, teachers, and schools are examined. Communication and leadership skills needed for case management, consultation, collaboration, conflict resolution/mediation, and professional decision-making used for IEP planning and transitioning students into adulthood are studied. Students consider their leadership abilities in becoming effective advocates and committed, ethical, and persuasive leaders in the field, honoring the dynamics of culture and family pertinent to educating exceptional students.

    IN 626 Environment Based Learning (3 s.h.)
    The local environment provides numerous opportunities for connections to K-12 academic standards in all content areas. In this course, students learn to integrate problem-based themes of the local community into the curriculum. Using the complex interconnections of natural and built environments, educators from rural to urban areas can facilitate investigations of real-world issues from a variety of perspectives: historical, scientific, socio-cultural, economic, and personal. This course emphasizes the history, philosophy, and theory of using Environment-Based Learning (EBL) to teach state and national standards.

    IN 627 Contemporary Learning Theory for Diverse Learners (3 s.h.)
    This course applies contemporary brain theory research to a wide range of diversity present in today’s schools. This course covers the role of challenge, perception, patterning, and spatial memory and the total physiology as part of learning. The underlying concept that each brain is unique provides the fundamental concepts of differentiated curriculum.

    IN 628 Public Policy and Community Relations in Education (3 s.h.)
    This course examines the influence of political and social constructs that affect decisions relative to education in both public and private schools, including home schooling. Emphasis is placed on the role of public education in the greater community. Using current legislative issues at state and federal levels, the students will consider the impact of public policy on effective schools.

    IN 629 Leadership in Education (3 s.h.)
    This course is designed to prepare students to be effective teacher leaders in their schools. It will focus on leadership styles, funding strategies, mediation strategies, and other issues related to empowering teachers to become school leaders.

    IN 630 Methods of Professional Inquiry (3 s.h.)
    This course will prepare students to conduct scholarly research through a wide variety of resources. Using both primary and secondary documents, students will learn how to search traditional and contemporary media documents. Further, students will learn how to formulate a thesis and appropriately document supporting evidence through literature reviews and research methodologies.

    IN 631 Curriculum Development and Design (3 s.h.)
    This course offers a critical analysis of the K-12 curriculum from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. It will include a review of historical developments, an analysis of pressures affecting curriculum change and status, an examination of curriculum-making issues, and a consideration of current trends in curriculum design and practice.

    IN 632 Education Law (3 s.h.)
    A study of the relevant legal principles that affect the operation, organization, and administration of schools in Virginia and the United States, students examine how judicial interpretation of common, statutory, and constitutional law influences educational policy making. This course assists teachers and others in related professions to gain knowledge about legal issues to help them effectively perform professional duties.

    IN 633 Assessment and Planning for Instructional Improvement (3 s.h.)
    This course emphasizes variables related to both short and long-term planning as well as assessment of curricular programs. Using a variety of assessment tools, students will learn how to analyze data and make informed decisions for program evaluation and classroom instruction. Discussions will also include the use of both quantitative and qualitative data in planning new curricular programs.

    IN 634 The Intersection of Life and Land: Issue-Driven Investigations (3 s.h.)
    This course is designed as a model of the environment-based learning process with an emphasis on topics in social studies and geography. Students participate in an investigation of a local socio/environmental issue, focusing on the integrated relationship of environment to people and culture. Investigations involve field trips and studies of history, literature, ecological principles, and cultural connections, and include strategies for implementing EBL projects with K-12 students.

    Professional (PSYC) Course Descriptions

    PSYC 513 Basic Concepts and Principles of Behavior Analysis (3 s.h.)
    This undergraduate, 45-hour course is designed to cover the basic concepts and principles of behavior analysis, as it evolved and derived from the earlier experimental analysis of behavior and as it related to the profession of applied behavior analysts. This class emphasizes the skills outlined in the Foundational Knowledge Accompanying the BACB Fourth Edition Task List, and will cover this section in its entirety. It will outline a brief history of behavior analysis, and topics related to conditioning and simple measurement concepts. The required books will be paired with a virtual lab, designed to allow for experiential learning and a deeper understanding of the concepts.