Is the program co-ed?

Yes. Although our residential college is for women, our adult degree program, and our graduate programs, have provided quality co-educational programs for more than 30 years.

What are the prerequisite courses?
Required Courses
Credit Hours
Comments
Human or Vertebrate Anatomy
4*
Lab recommended
Human or Vertebrate Physiology 4* Lab recommended
Biology 3 At least one course; Upper level biology such as cell biology or histology are recommended, but not required.
Chemistry 8 Must include labs
Physics 8 General physics, must include labs
Psychology 6 1 intro and 1 upper or 2 upper level psychology courses;Abnormal and developmental psychology are preferred.
Statistics 3 Can be from biology, mathematics, psychology, or business; NOTE: if a psychology course is used to meet this requirement it cannot also be used for the psychology requirement.

*can be combined A/P for 8 credits, but must include labs

What major should I pick as an undergraduate student preparing to apply to the graduate program?

There is no one major that is required, as long as the prerequisite coursework has been taken.  Although we expect to see a wide variety of majors, Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service, or PTCAS, reports that the majority of applicants have reported majors in biology, psychology, kinesiology, health science and exercise science.

What is the minimum GPA?

You will need a minimum of 3.0 for your overall GPA, but we expect that most accepted students will surpass this minimum. In addition, all prerequisite courses must reflect a “C” or better to be accepted.

What GRE scores do I need?

The GRE scores will be considered along with other admissions requirements. There is no minimum GRE score required to apply.

What are my chances of getting in?

This will vary depending on the number of applications each year. We have a maximum proposed class of 35 students.

Who should write my references?

One reference must be from a physical therapist. Other references can be professionals who have observed you in a patient care environment, college professors, or prior employers. References from family members or friends are not recommended.

Do you accept transfer of graduate-level coursework from other institutions?

Our courses are arranged in a lock-step sequence, therefore we cannot accept graduate transfer credits.  These courses may, however, be used to meet the prerequisite requirements.

Will I be able to work while enrolled in the program?

Due to the rigor of the graduate programs, students are strongly advised against employment while enrolled in the program. No time will be granted for students to seek or maintain employment. Employment while enrolled in the program may lead to poor academic performance and failure and should not be pursued.

About the profession:

Physical therapists (PTs) are highly educated, licensed health care professionals who can help patients reduce pain and improve or restore mobility — in many cases without expensive surgery and often reducing the need for long-term use of prescription medications and their side effects.

Physical therapists can teach patients how to prevent or manage their condition so that they will achieve long-term health benefits. PTs examine each individual and develop a plan, using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. In addition, PTs work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility before it occurs by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.

Physical therapists provide care for people in a variety of settings, including hospitals, private practices, outpatient clinics, home health agencies, schools, sports and fitness facilities, work settings, and nursing homes. State licensure is required in each state in which a physical therapist practices.

(Source: Reprinted from American Physical Therapy Association, www.APTA.org. Retrieved 2013. For additional information about the PT profession, go the http://www.apta.org/Careers/)

What do physical therapists do?

PTs diagnose and treat individuals of all ages, from newborns to the very oldest, who have medical problems or other health-related conditions that limit their abilities to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives.

PTs examine each individual and develop a plan using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. In addition, PTs work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility before it occurs by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.

PTs are highly educated, licensed health care professionals who can help patients reduce pain and improve or restore mobility — in many cases without expensive surgery and often reducing the need for long-term use of prescription medications and their side effects.

Physical therapists can teach patients how to prevent or manage their condition so that they will achieve long-term health benefits. PTs examine each individual and develop a plan, using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. In addition, PTs work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility before it occurs by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.

Physical therapists provide care for people in a variety of settings, including hospitals, private practices, outpatient clinics, home health agencies, schools, sports and fitness facilities, work settings, and nursing homes. State licensure is required in each state in which a physical therapist practices.

(Source: Reprinted from American Physical Therapy Association, www.APTA.org. Retrieved 2013. For additional information about the PT profession, go the http://www.apta.org/Careers/)

Where do physical therapists practice?

Physical therapists practice in a variety of settings including:

  • Hospitals
  • Outpatient clinics or offices
  • Inpatient rehabilitation facilities
  • Skilled nursing, extended care, or subacute facilities
  • Homes
  • Education or research centers
  • Schools
  • Hospices
  • Industrial, workplace, or other occupational environments
  • Fitness centers and sports training facilities

(Source: Reprinted from American Physical Therapy Association, www.APTA.org. Retrieved 2013. For additional information about the PT profession, go the http://www.apta.org/Careers/)